DOODLE ART Connections

Illustration by Gary Crossey

Circle & Lines

I still don’t understand why my studio went without a scanner for any length of time. I am such a scanner fan. I love how I can capture different stages of a drawing. Often the steps toward the end images can create unusual patterns – that may not be as present in a later stage of the design process.

Digital Illustration

Repeating and position the copies in a circle motion. The overlapping design forms a large hexagon pattern.

By Gary Crossey

Circle and lines by Gary Crossey Graphic DesignerPattern created by Graphic Designer Gary Crossey (Asheville).

Hand Drawn Illustrations

Doodle Art – Ink Illustrations.

I always like drawing with ink. It was until discovering Aubrey Beardsley (1984) that I became a huge enthusiast. (2017) Many of my design inspirations still pull from Beardsley’s influence.The illustrations tend to work best for me when they have a resistance to color.

The starkness of the Black and White hand drawn illustrations always interests me. Hand-drawn ink illustrations reach into a moment. Long enough to create an interpretation. There are no redos. Each line is a commitment.

Doodle art by Graphic designer Gary Crossey

Hand Drawn Illustration - Ink

Read my MINDFUL DOODLES Publication

DOODLE Phone Call

Doodle Art Phone Call by Gary Crossey

Doodle Art inspired by a phone call from a friend. The beginning sketch (below) centers on the brightest, fullest sunflower (you have to imagine your own yellow). What makes doodle art interesting is that often the patterns created take on an element of math.

Doodle Art by Gary Crossey Phone call eary The Phone Call doodle echoes the number 6.

The design elements either double to 12 items or reduce to 3 design elements.

The design has six main sections, which content central design elements of six dots, three on either side. With 3 dots leading out of each division, to be greeted with a 3 stack column. Most (but not all) of the shell-fanning are groups of 12.

The final part of the math is to divide the largest of the echoed numbers 12, by the lowest echoed number 3. 12 / 3 = 4. Creates the format that the design reaches out to four panels, while also growing out of groups of four shell-fans that bands around the Sunflower.

BLOG: How to create a logo

AI-Rough-Sketch-LogoWhen creating a logo – the process can be very different from one client to the next. Often the clients expectations and lack of experience can account for the varied design processes.

Designing a Logo for a Brand

Given my client pool, I am lucky to work with creative people. I surround myself with skillful and creative types that are seldom wrong when it comes to the principles of visual composition.

When clients come to me for graphic design services – they often have the design concept and brand philosophy developed. At which time – my role as the graphic designer is defined. I am there to ensure that the logo renders correctly and is aesthetically pleasing – while reaching the project design objective.

Designing the logo for a Brand. That’s the natural Logo Design approach. The conceptual developmental of the Brand is complete. The visual logo simply needs to acquire the right personality.

And the Rough Sketches can quickly move into refined ideas.

Designing a Logo without a Brand

Yes, I know – as a graphic designer we should never let this happen. But it does. Maybe you like the business idea or the client is refreshing, or you just feel like giving someone a break. Whatever the reason – you allow the client to move forward to the design process, without a brand. With the idea of working backward to establish the brand philosophy.

The difference between the old client and the newbie is that the experienced have structured their thoughts into a formatted project plan. The other client this has the ideas in their head. It isn’t that they don’t know – they just have never been asked before. And so the process begins.

From Logo to Brand

For most of the world, the role of Branding and Logo Design is confusing. The experienced graphic designer understands that the Brand is the business reputation – the business equity – built upon reliable products and reliable service.

The Logo Design – while the logo is the first visual component of the branding process. The logo does not stand alone to create or maintain the business values and customer loyalty.

For more information on how to build a strong, loyal brand – read my blog BUILDING A BRAND.

Creating a logo without a brand is not an ideal approach. But, as many graphic designers understand – especially those graphic designers that work with start-ups. You as the designer may be the first person in the world to ask your clients about their business goals.

Your Graphic Designer is the only person who cares to ask you branding questions

Be honest, no-one else is interested in our work ideas. People are not stopping me in the street and asked about my yearly business goals, or what I hope to achieve ten years from now. No one cares about my moral stands. I do however get stopped in the grocery store to answer computer tech and design questions. Which is typically fine, expect when selecting toilet rolls – that I like to do alone.

Building the Brand backward

The logo creating begins. In this case, the client was more visual that conceptual.

Early Logo Roughs

Get the design ball rolling with simple sketches.

RoughSketch 006asheville_salon_log_rough

roughRoughSketch 011RoughSketch 009 RoughSketch 007